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THE OBSESSION // THE GET DOWN

August 9, 2016

 

While we certainly appreciate fine art, high fashion, and fancy food, we also will not pretend like we don't count a Netflix binge as one of life's greatest pleasures. Especially when we find a series that is not only entertaining, but informative, artistic, and smart, too.

 

Next on our list of must-see TV? The Get Down. It's a Netflix original and we've been counting down til its August 12 debut since we first heard about it. In case you, too, don't have the date marked on your calendar (i.e. if you have somehow managed to escape the cultural phenomenon known as "Netflix and chill" unaffected), the series will chronicle the fledgling hip hop scene in 1970s New York City, specifically the South Bronx.

 

We're excited for it for a few reasons. 

 

For one, we're intrigued by the show's creator, Baz Luhrmann, and how he will handle his depiction of 1970s New York. Until now, Luhrmann has stuck to the big screen, been best-known as the director behind movies like The Great Gatsby, Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge. He spares no expense (creatively and literally, this is Netflix's costliest series yet) when it comes to setting the scene for his stories to unfold, and this show promises to go some pretty intriguing places, from a "war-like" Bronx neighborhood, to a fictionalized Studio 54, and even CBGB. We'd watch the show for set design alone. 

 

But also, The Get Down will tell a story that has not been told in pop culture, at least not in any high-profile way. While the rise of hip hop in the 1980s is almost infamous, its roots in the late 1970s are still a bit of a mystery. The show's muse, consultant, and producer, Grandmaster Flash, told Vogue, “The world needs to know that the seventies were a blueprint for everything in hip-hop." As creative types, we agree, and feel like understanding the evolution of one of the most influential musical and style movements in recent history, and how it went on to change the course of not just music, but dance, and contemporary culture forever should be requisite viewing. 

 

August 12. Watch party at our place. 

 

All images: Annie Leibovitz for Vogue

 

 

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